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Daily Archives: Tuesday 5 July 2016

More doctoral success for the Department of History, Philosophy and Religion in a record-breaking semester

PG graduation

Last week, Melanie Bashor successfully defended her doctoral thesis entitled “Engineering Tolerance: Origins of Multicultural Education Policies in the Atlantic World from 1941‒1988.

Melanie’s success rounds off a record-breaking semester for the Department of History, Philosophy and Religion, bringing the total of doctoral completions this year to ten.

Recent completions also include:

  • Dr Stephen Massie, “The Imperialism of Cecil John Rhodes: Metropolitan Perceptions of a Colonial Reputation.”
  • Dr Jenny Wright, “Public Health Women Doctors in England, 1965-1991.”
  • Dr Christine Bianco, “Modern Art for Middle America: American Abstraction in Mass Magazines, 1946–1960.” Director: Dr Elizabeth Darling
  • Dr Catriona Gilmour-Hamilton: “A Cohort of One: Oral Narratives of Cancer Research in Britain, 1970–2010.” Directors: Dr Viviane Quirke and Dr Marius Turda

“I’m absolutely delighted. Doctorates don’t happen overnight, of course, and the success we’re currently enjoying reflects years of hard work on the part of students and their supervisors right across the department”Dr Tom Crook, Postgraduate Research Tutor

“I’m absolutely delighted. Doctorates don’t happen overnight, of course, and the success we’re currently enjoying reflects years of hard work on the part of students and their supervisors right across the department,” said Dr Tom Crook, Postgraduate Research Tutor for the department.

“The good thing,” he added, “is that this hard work continues, and there are plenty more in the pipeline. So watch this space!”

The department of History, Philosophy and Religion has nine interconnected research communities, supporting our doctoral students and encouraging wide participation through partnerships, research centres, conferences and public events.

Further information about our current cohort of doctoral students, including student profiles, can be found here.

 

Oxford Brookes students win prestigious mooting competition

Pictured: James Fennemore (left) and Jonathan Goddard (right) outside the Essex Court Chambers. Image courtesy of the English-Speaking Union (ESU)

Pictured: James Fennemore (left) and Jonathan Goddard (right) outside the Essex Court Chambers. Image courtesy of the English-Speaking Union (ESU)

Law students from Oxford Brookes University have won the ESU Essex Court National Mooting Competition 2016 for the third time in five years.

James Fennemore and Jonathan Goddard beat students at Liverpool John Moores University in the Grand Final last month (Wednesday 22 June) at the Royal Courts of Justice.

Founded in 1972, The ESU Essex Court National Mooting Competition is one of the most prestigious legal competitions of its kind, with teams from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland entering.

“We were delighted to win this prestigious competition last year and back in 2012, so to win again this year is a great achievement for the students and a testament to their hard work and skills as future lawyers.”

Marc Howe, Principal Lecturer in Law 

The winning duo were presented with the ‘Silver Mace’ and £1,000 each plus a further £1,000 for the Oxford Brookes’ School of Law which will go towards funding future mooting competitions.

Last year Oxford Brookes law students Nicole Kapu and Duncan Graves won the same competition and went on to face the winners of the Inner Temple Inter-Varsity Mooting Competition in the Magna Carta Moot in October, who unprecedentedly, were also Brookes Law students.

James and Jonathan will now represent the UK in the Commonwealth Mooting Competition in Melbourne in March 2017. They will follow in the footsteps of Matt Sellwood and Daniele Selmi who won the ESU Essex Court Competition for Oxford Brookes in 2012, and went on to win the Commonwealth Mooting Competition in Cape Town in 2013.

Marc Howe, Principal Lecturer in Law and University Teaching Fellow said: “In the last few years our School of Law’s reputation for national mooting success has grown significantly, so it is fantastic to see this success continue. We were delighted to win this prestigious competition last year and back in 2012, so to win again this year is a great achievement for the students and a testament to their hard work and skills as future lawyers.”

Mooting is the traditional method through which law students are introduced to practical experience of courtroom advocacy. All students on academic law programmes in the School of Law have the opportunity to participate in internal mooting competitions, with the winners representing Brookes in national mooting competitions.

More information about studying at Law at Oxford Brookes University can be found on the School of Law webpages.